theweekmagazine:

Redskins players enter game with raised hands in solidarity with Ferguson protesters
The gesture is a symbolic nod to Michael Brown, who witnesses says had his hands up when he was shot to death by a police officer

theweekmagazine:

Redskins players enter game with raised hands in solidarity with Ferguson protesters

The gesture is a symbolic nod to Michael Brown, who witnesses says had his hands up when he was shot to death by a police officer

The Washington Redskins released an ad this week featuring Native Americans defending the team’s name as a symbol of pride. Burson-Marsteller is supporting the team, which is under growing pressure to change its nickname. In April, the franchise’s #RedskinsPride Twitter campaign drew an angry response from opponents, who mocked the initiative.

Behind the scenes on our photo shoot with Mike Bass, communications EVP at the NBA. Bass has worked at the NBA for 17 years — read about his game-winning PR strategies here.

The Minnesota Twins and Ronald McDonald House teamed up to mark the 20th anniversary of the movie Little Big League, in which a 12-year-old manages the Twins. In real life, the Twin Cities Ronald McDonald House and the Twins allowed 14-year-old Ryan Leuschen to serve as the team’s honorary manager for a day. Olson Engage helped with the effort.

Coca-Cola, McDonald’s, Visa, and Adidas were the most recognized sponsors of the World Cup in Brazil, achieving recognition among 50%, 39%, 41%, and 36% of UK, US, and Brazilian consumers, respectively, according to research from GlobalWebIndex. 

However, 30% of those surveyed thought non-sponsor Nike was officially associated with the event, with similar levels of misplaced recognition for MasterCard (25%) and Samsung (20%). Read more.

Coca-Cola, McDonald’s, Visa, and Adidas were the most recognized sponsors of the World Cup in Brazil, achieving recognition among 50%, 39%, 41%, and 36% of UK, US, and Brazilian consumers, respectively, according to research from GlobalWebIndex.

However, 30% of those surveyed thought non-sponsor Nike was officially associated with the event, with similar levels of misplaced recognition for MasterCard (25%) and Samsung (20%). Read more.

The scale of social media back-and-forth during the World Cup final was staggering. About 280 million Facebook interactions took place during the match, as did nearly 619,000 tweets per minute.
Argentina beat the Netherlands in penalty kicks on Wednesday to advance to the finals of the World Cup against Germany. But the real winner is Adidas, who makes the jerseys of both finalists. US-based Nike has the rights to the shirts of Brazil and the Netherlands, who will face off for third place on Saturday.

Argentina star Lionel Messi is also one of Adidas’ high-profile endorsers.
How some brands responded to Brazil’s loss against Germany

How World Cup players are using social media (via The New York Times)

Above: Brazilian star Neymar addresses fans in a YouTube video after being injured

You know who’s not a fan of the selfie trend? Cyclists in the Tour de France.

Related: Where PR fits in to the Tour de France